Binding Raw Edges

Bias binding is simply a strip of fabric cut on the diagonal to make it stretchy which is used to bind a raw edge.  I have used these techniques in my girls’ blouses.

To make your bias binding find the diagonal by folding your fabric into a triangle and cut a strip off the fold, four times the width of your final binding**.  Fold the bias binding in half lengthways and iron.  Fold both sides into the centre fold and iron.  Then fold the whole strip in half and iron again.

If you need to join two pieces of binding, place them at right angles to each other with right sides together and sew a diagonal seam.  Trim and iron.

I have seen people (including a professional wedding dress maker) sewing to near the end of a strip of binding, folding over the raw edge of a second piece, placing it under the end of the first piece and continuing to sew.  I’m not sure about this, it does leave a noticeable bump.  But it is easy and quick, so it’s up to you.

Hand Sewn Bias Binding.

This will produce a decorative edge with no visible stitching.  To bind a raw edge pin the bias binding to the right side of the fabric.  Sew along the first crease, fold over to the inside and hand sew in place.

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This is the one I use the most.  The stitching is invisible but it takes a while to do which is not normally a problem for me as I like to hand sew.

Machine Top Stitched Bias Binding.

A neat row of machine stitching will be visible.  Pin the bias binding to the wrong side of the fabric.  Sew along the first crease, fold over to the right side and sew a line of top stitching close to the edge.

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This is not a bad result.  It is neat and was quick, but it is a bit flat and you can see that stitching.

Traditional Machine Sewn Bias Binding.

**Cut your bias binding 2 mm wider than normal.  When you fold and iron it, remember to have the crease 2 mm off centre, so that when you fold the sides into this crease and iron you will have the second side of binding wider than the first.

Pin it to the right side of the fabric.  Sew along the first crease (the narrower of the two).  Fold over to the wrong side, ensuring it covers the stitch line and pin in place.  From the right side sew a line of top stitching ‘in the ditch’ just below the binding.  It will catch the binding on the back but miss the binding on the front.

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This one has definitely turned out the best.  The stitching cannot be seen, but as I used a machine the stitching is firm and has pulled the fabric together giving the actual binding a more rounded appearance and it didn’t take any longer than the machine top stitched version.  (I just need to remember to make it 2 mm wider and to fold it 2 mm off centre.)

It has been really useful to make all three versions at the same time with the same fabric for comparison.  I will probably use the third version the most from now on instead of sewing it all by hand.

To avoid a lump at an underarm seam, whichever method you have chosen, once you have pinned your binding on, sew the ends together, trim and iron open before sewing the binding to the garment.

Self Binding For Gathered Edges.

This is for when you want to neaten a seam that is made up of a gathered piece of fabric and a flat piece of fabric such as attaching a sleeve or a gathered skirt to a bodice.

Sew the gathered fabric to the flat fabric with a straight seam and trim half the seam allowance from the gathered fabric but not the flat fabric.  Double fold the flat piece over the trimmed gathers and top stitch in place.

This provides a really good looking, non bulky finish that doesn’t really take any longer than trimming and zigzag stitching or over-locking the edges.

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